The Living lab, one part of “Open Innovation 2.0”, conducts regular social experiments in areas where people actually live.

For the past 10-15 years in Europe, with Northern Europe especially taking the lead, and with the backing of the EU as well as individual governments, living labs have held co-creative activities in which citizens and users can participate.For this “Living lab”, two functions; “Co-creation” and “Testbed” are required. For users, there are two roles; partnering to co-create services and products (hereafter referred to as services), and monitoring those services.The former role is to participate in suggesting and planning ideas for services, and the latter role is to monitor the scene of use to acquire fresh awareness for developers. Living Labs function by having various stakeholders participate and contribute by providing differing values.Therefore, the aim of businesses participating in projects is not only to develop and improve services, but to create networks and to develop methods of co-creating with various stakeholders.Co-creation method means a series of activities; launching living labs, gaining ideas from a user’s point of view, acquiring awareness derived from practical use, improving prototypes and conducting quick verification. In addition to creating and improving their own services, by supporting the living lab Governments can raise interest both inside and outside the region, and make it easier to support the formation of social capital, and to discover and utilize regional resources.By conducting research that is useful in actual society, Universities can contribute to the formation and bridging of innovation networks.By using their own needs and ideas, Users and Citizens can participate in the co-creation of services, in this way helpful for both problem solving and raising awareness of social contribution.

リビングラボ

リビングラボ